General

New Bedding Plants and Annuals

When choosing plants for retail sale, trial gardens can help growers decide which plants to grow and provide information to customers.

Dr. Douglas Cox, University of Massachusetts reported some observations on some new and recent introductions made on plants growing in a small trial garden run by Durfee Conservatory at UMass, trial gardens at Elm Bank, Dover, MA and plantings of his own in Sunderland, MA.    

Here are excerpts from the article:

Funding for High Tunnels

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will provide financial assistance for a new pilot project to establish high tunnels to increase the availability of locally grown produce in a conservation-friendly way. This is being done through their Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Participating farms can receive funding for one high tunnel up to approximately a 30 by 72 foot structure. Farmers in New England and New York who would like to sign-up for the high tunnel pilot, should call or visit their local NRCS office by January 15, 2010.

Saving Energy Dollars

The payback on energy conservation is only 6 months to 2 years according to John Bartok at a recent Connecticut Greenhouse Growers Program.

Energy conservation is an important first step even if you are considering changing to alternative fuels. So, take some time to do a walk thru energy audit of your greenhouse operation and see web sites below for links to more information on energy conservation and renewable energy to assist in your decision making and planning for the future.

For more information:

New Bedding Plants and Annuals

When choosing plants for retail sale, trial gardens can help growers decide which plants to grow and provide information to customers.

Dr. Douglas Cox, University of Massachusetts reported some observations on some new and recent introductions made on plants growing in a small trial garden run by Durfee Conservatory at UMass, trial gardens at Elm Bank, Dover, MA and plantings of his own in Sunderland, MA.    

Here are excerpts from the article:

Soil Testing and Plant Diagnostic Laboratories

Diagnosis is the first step in implementing effective and economic management practices. Identification of insects, diseases and nutritional problems saves money by reducing crop losses, improves the quality and marketability of your crops and prevents unnecessary and incorrect pesticide or fertilizer applications.

Here is an up-to-date listing of the laboratories in Massachusetts andConnecticut and guidelines for taking samples to send to a diagnostic lab.

Soil Testing

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